Art Fact Friday (on a Saturday)

Art Fact Friday (on a Saturday) – Another painting in the collection of the Art Institute of Chicago is Edward Hopper’s Nighthawks. Hopper allegedly based the painting on a diner that was located in New York City’s Greenwich Village in an area where Greenwich Street meets 11th Street and 7th Avenue called Mulry Square. But he actually based the painting on an all-night coffee stand. “I simplified the scene a great deal and made the restaurant bigger,” he said. “Unconsciously, probably, I was painting the loneliness of a large city.”

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Exhibition of Master Ceramic Sculptor Chris Gustin Saturday, February 23rd

ContactSheet-platters

Come meet Master sculptor Chris Gustin and experience his awesome wood-fired ceramic works at his opening exhibition from 6pm to 9pm at KAJ Gallery. Wine and light hors d’oeuvres will be served. The show will be held in conjunction with our other show just a mile away at the Naples Art, Antiques and Jewelry Show (booth 211). That show runs from the 23rd to the 26th. I have free passes to that show for 2 while supplies last .

Don’t miss this rare opportunity to meet and experience the works of one of the greatest living ceramic sculptors in America.

About the artist:

SELECTED PUBLIC/CORPORATE COLLECTIONS

Archie Bray Foundation; Helena, MT
ASU Ceramic Research Center; Tempe, AZ
Art Complex Museum; Duxbury, MA
Belger Art Center; Kansas City, MO
New Bedford Whaling Museum; New Bedford, MA
Ceramics Monthly Magazine
Crocker Art Museum; Sacramento, CA
Currier Museum of Art; Manchester, NH
Daum Museum of Art; Sedalia, MO
DePauw Museum of Art
Detroit Institute of Art
Everson Museum of Art, NY
First Bank Systems, St. Paul, MN
Fuller Craft Museum; Brockton, MA
Georgia State University
The Graham Collection; Paul Melon Art Center, CT
Icheon World Ceramic Center; Icheon, Korea
Johnson County Community College, KS
Kalamazoo Institute of the Arts, MI
Kemper Museum of Art; Kansas City, MO
Los Angeles County Museum of Art
Minneapolis Institute of the Arts
Mint Museum of Craft; Charlotte, NC
Museum of Art and Design, NY
Museum of Craft and Folk Art; San Francisco, CA
Museo de Azulejo; Lisbon, Portugal
The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; Houston, TX
Newark Museum of Art, NJ
New Bedford Whaling Museum; New Bedford, MA
New York State College of Ceramics at Alfred
Nora Eccles Harrison Museum of Art; Logan, UT
Racine Art Museum; Racine, WI
Rayovac Corporation; Madison, WI
Renwick Gallery of the Museum of American Art;
Smithsonian; Washington, DC
Rhode Island School of Design Art Museum
San Angelo Museum of Fine Arts, TX
Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art; Scottsdale, AZ
Shigaraki Ceramic Cultural Park; Japan
Shiwan Treasure Pottery Museum; P.R. China
Sonnenschein, Nath and Rosenthal; KC, MO
The St. Paul Companies, St. Paul, MN
Victoria and Albert Museum; London, UK
Weber State College; Ogden, Utah
Yingge Ceramics Museum; Taipei, Taiwan

Art Fact Friday (on Saturday)

Art Fact Friday (on Saturday)- Les Demoiselles d’Avignon – Picasso’s abstract depiction of five Barcelona prostitutes was deemed immoral when it debuted at the artist’s studio in 1907. Picasso created over 100 preliminary sketches and studies before setting his vision down on canvas, and in previous incarnations the figure at the far left was a man.

picasso

Art Fact Friday (on a Saturday)

Art Fact Friday – There are technically five separate versions of Expressionist artist Edvard Munch’s most famous work, The Scream. The first two, from 1893 and created with tempera and crayon on cardboard, are located in the National Gallery in Oslo and the Munch Museum, respectively. A privately owned third version created in 1895 with pastels recently sold for nearly $120 million at auction. Yet another version from 1895 is a black and white lithograph. A final version, done in 1910 by Munch due to the popularity of the previous incarnations, is also held in the Munch Museum, and it made headlines in recent years for being stolen in 2004 and recovered in 2006.

scream